Veneers

a veneer is a thin layer of restorative material placed over a tooth surface, either to improve the aesthetics of a tooth, or to protect a damaged tooth surface. There are two main types of material used to fabricate a veneer, composite and dental porcelain.

Composite Veneers

Composite veneers are a more cost effective, versatile, and less invasive alternative to porcelain veneers. They serve the same purpose, though instead of a cover being attached, the tooth is reconstructed through a build up of composite filling material. As well as serving aesthetic and functional purposes to the same degree as porcelain veneers, composite veneers are much more flexible and versatile because they can be repaired, altered or re-done at any time.

This means that the colour can be subject to change (if the surrounding teeth are either whitened or become darker), the shape can be changed (if the patient desires) and they can be polished if dull or discoloured. Composite veneers are commonly done in conjunction with restorations and/or repairs on the front teeth.

Porcelain Veneers

Porcelain veneers are thin layers of porcelain fixed onto teeth to enhance appearance, and in some cases, to protect the teeth. Veneers allow many patients to achieve a dramatic smile makeover without highly invasive treatments. The results are also durable, lasting 10-30 years.

Veneers typically require 2-3 appointments. The first is a consultation to determine the desired look, and plan the shape of the veneers to achieve it.

During the second visit, the tooth surfaces will be prepared, by removing a very thin layer of enamel, and taking impressions of the teeth. Using these impressions, veneers are fabricated to fit onto the surfaces, either on-site, or at a lab facility.

On the third visit, the dentist will apply a cleaning solution to prepare the tooth surfaces for bonding, and the permanent veneers will be cemented.